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EASA Part 66  Module 11

Part 66 Module 11A Overall rating: ★★★★☆ 4.4 based on 373 reviews
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Turbine Aeroplane Aerodynamics, Structures and Systems (5672 Questions)

Sample          –  Turbine Aeroplane Exams ( 40 questions 30 min),
Category A Turbine Aeroplane Exams ( 108 questions 135 min),
Category B1Turbine Aeroplane Exams ( 140 questions 175 min),

EASA Part 66 Module 11 Chapters 

Chapter 1/21: Theory of Flight (page 1.1 to 1.22).
Chapter 2/21: Airframe Structures-Gen. Concepts (page 2.1 to 2.24).
Chapter 3/21: Airframe Structures – Aeroplances (page 3.1 to 3.22).
Chapter 4/21: Air Conditioning and Cabin Pressurization ATA 21 (page 4.1 to 4.42).
Chapter 5/21: Instruments/Avionic Systems (page 5.1 to 5.102).
Chapter 6/21: Electrical Power ATA 24 (page 6.1 to 6.44).
Chapter 7/21: Equipment and Furnishings ATA 25 (page 7.1 to 7.10).
Chapter 8/21: Fire Protection ATA 26 (page 8.1 to 8.26).
Chapter 9/21: Flight Controls ATA 27 (page 9.1 to 9.20).
Chapter 10/21: Fuel Systems ATA 28 (page 10.1 to 10.42).
Chapter 11/21: Hydraulic Power ATA 29 (page 11.1 to 11.48).
Chapter 12/21: Ice and Rain Protection ATA 30 (page 12.1 to 12.6).
Chapter 13/21: Landing Gear ATA 32 (page 13.1 to 13.96).
Chapter 14/21: Light ATA 33 (page 14.1 to 14.8).
Chapter 15/21: Oxygen ATA 35 (page 15.1 to 15.24).
Chapter 16/21: Pneumatic/Vacuum ATA 36 (page 16.1 to 16.30).
Chapter 17/21: Water/Waste ATA 38 (page 17.1 to 17.12).
Chapter 18/21: On Board Maintenance Systems ATA 45 (page 18.1 to 18.10.
Chapter 19/21: Integrated Modular Avionics ATA 42 (page 19.1 to 19.12).
Chapter 20/21: Cabin Systems (page 20.1 to 20.8).
Chapter 21/21: Information Systems ATA 46 (page 20.1 to 21.8).

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Module 11: Turbine Aeroplane Aerodynamics, Structures and Systems

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EASA Part 66 Module 11 Sub Modules

AEROPLANE AERODYNAMIC S AND FLIGHT CONTROLS

The directional control of a fixed wing aircraft takes place around the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical axes by means of flight control surfaces designed to create movement about these axes. These control devices are hinged or movable surfaces through which the attitude of an aircraft is controlled during takeoff, flight, and landing. They are usually divided into two major groups: 1) primary or main flight control surfaces and 2) secondary or auxiliary control surfaces.

PRIMARY FLIGHT CONTROL SURFACES

The primary flight control surfaces on a fixed wing aircraft include: ailerons, elevators, and the rudder. The ailerons are attached to the trailing edge of both wings and when moved, rotate the aircraft around the longitudinal axis. The elevator is attached to the trailing edge of the horizontal stabilizer. When it is moved, it alters aircraft pitch, which is the attitude about the horizontal or lateral axis. The rudder is hinged to the trailing edge of the vertical stabilizer. When the rudder changes position, the aircraft rotates about the vertical axis (yaw). Figure 1-1 shows the primary flight controls of a light aircraft and the movement they create relative to the three axes of flight part 66 module 11 exam.

Primary control surfaces are usually similar in construction to one another and vary only in size, shape, and methods of attachment. On aluminum light aircraft, their structure is often similar to an all metal wing. This is appropriate because the primary control surfaces are simply smaller aerodynamic devices. They are typically made from an aluminum alloy structure built around a single spar member or torque tube to which ribs are fitted and a skin is attached. The lightweight ribs are, in many cases, stamped out from flat aluminum sheet stock. Holes in the ribs lighten the assembly. An aluminum skin is attached with rivets.
Figure 1-2 illustrates this type of structure, which can be found on the primary control surfaces of light aircraft as well as on medium and heavy aircraft part 66 module 11 exam.

 


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EASA Part 66 Module 11 Turbine Aeroplane Aerodynamics
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EASA Part 66 Module 11 Turbine Aeroplane Aerodynamics
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The primary flight control surfaces on a fixed wing aircraft include: ailerons, elevators, and the rudder. The ailerons are attached to the trailing edge of both wings and when moved, rotate the aircraft around the longitudinal axis. The elevator is attached to the trailing edge of the horizontal stabilizer
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