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Module 3 Ch 7/18 Resistance & Resistor.

EASA Part 66 Module 3 Book Electricity Fundamentals Ch 7/18 Overall rating: ★★★★☆ 4.4 based on 386 reviews
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Chapters 

Chapter 6/18 : DC Circuits (page 6.1 to 6.14).
Chapter 7/18 : Resistance & Resistor (page 7.1 to 7.14).
Chapter 8/18 : Power (page 8.1 to 8.6).
Chapter 9/18 : Capacitance & Capacitor (page 9.1 to 9.12).
Chapter 10/18 : Magnetism (page 10.1 to 10.14).
Chapter 11/18 : Inductance & Inductor (page 11.1 to 11.8).
Chapter 12/18 : DC Motor & Generator Theory (page 12.1 to 12.28).

 

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EASA Part 66 Module 3 Electrical Fundamentals Question Exam

Sample          –  Electrical Exams ( 40 questions 30 min),
Category A   –  Electrical Exams ( 20 questions 25 min),
Category B1 –  Electrical Exams ( 52 questions 65 min),
Category B2Electrical Exams ( 52 questions 65 min),
Category B3Electrical Exams ( 24 questions 30 min),

Module 3: Electrica...
 

Module 3: Electrical Fundamentals

Easa part 66 discussion Module 3: Electrical Fundamentals
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Part 66 Module Books PDF:

OHM’S LAW (RESISTANCE)
The two fundamental properties of current and voltage are related by a third property known as resistance. In any electrical circuit, when voltage is applied to it, a current will result. The resistance of the conductor will determine the amount of current that flows under the given voltage. In most cases, the greater the circuit resistance, the less the current. If the resistance is reduced, then the current will increase. This relation is linear in nature and is known as Ohm’s law easa part 66 modules books pdf .
By having a linearly proportional characteristic, it is meant that if one unit in the relationship increases or decreases by a certain percentage, the other variables in the relationship will increase or decrease by the same percentage. An example would be if the voltage across a resistor is doubled, then the current through the resistor doubles. It should be added that this relationship is true only if the resistance in the circuit remains constant. For it can be seen that if the resistance changes, current also changes. A graph of this relationship is shown in Figure 7-1, which uses a constant resistance of 2051. easa part 66 modules books pdf