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Part 66 module 5 Data Conversion.

EASA Part 66 Module 5 Digital Techniques Ch 3/15 Overall rating: ★★★★☆ 4.4 based on 392 reviews
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Chapters 

Chapter 1/15: Electronic Instruments Systems (page 1.1 to 1.14).
Chapter 2/15: Numbering Systems (page 2.1 to 2.10).
Chapter 3/15: Data Conversion (page 3.1 to 3.13).
Chapter 4/15: Data Bus (page 4.1 to 4.10).
Chapter 5/15: Logic Circuits (page 5.1 to 5.10).

 

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Digital Techniques, Electronic Instrument Systems (5584 Questions)

Sample          –  Digital Techniques Exams ( 40 questions 30 min),
Category ADigital Techniques Exams ( 16 questions 20 min),
Category B1.1 and B1.3Digital Techniques Exams ( 40 questions 50 min),
Category B1.2 and B1.4Digital Techniques Exams ( 20 questions 25 min),
Category B2Digital Techniques Exams ( 72 questions 90 min),
Category B3Digital Techniques Exams ( 16 questions 20 min),

EASA Part 66 module 5 book Forum

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Module 5: Digital Techniques, Electronic Instrument Systems 

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EASA Part 66 Module 5 Syllabus Content:

DATA CONVERSION
ANALOG DATA Analog and digital signals can both contain the same useful information. For example, an analog watch with hands pointing to numbers on a dial tells the time just as well as a LCD watch that displays digital numbers. The advantage of the analog watch is that is that it tells time in relative terms, such as 1/4 past the 11th hour; whereas the digital watch tells time in discrete units, such as 11:15 am. Many cockpit instruments display both analog and digital formats easa part 66 module 5 syllabus.
Analog circuits are different from digital circuits in that they do not have two set values, such as 0 volts representing “OFF” and 5 volts representing “ON”. Instead, analog circuits will vary continuously in both time and value from high to low easa part 66 module 5 syllabus. AC (alternating current) analog signals can be bipolar in that they have both positive and negative limits as seen in an AC sine wave. Figure 3-1 illustrates the sine wave output of an AC synchronous transmitter that varies in value (amplitude) from 0 volts to its +5 volt limit and returns to 0 volts before moving to its -5 volt limit and then back to 0 volts in one time cycle. DC (direct current) analog easa part 66 module 5 syllabus