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Module 6 Ch 9/11 Transmissions.

EASA Part 66 Module 6 Material and Hardware Ch 9/11 Overall rating: ★★★★☆ 4.4 based on 392 reviews
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Chapters 

Chapter 7/11: Springs (page 7.1 to 7.8).
Chapter 8/11: Bearings (page 8.1 to 8.6).
Chapter 9/11: Transmissions (page 9.1 to 9.12).
Chapter 10/11: Control Cables (page 10.1 to 10.10).
Chapter 11/11: Electrical Cables and Connectors (page 11.1 to 11.22).

 

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Materials and Hardware (4164 Questions)

Sample          –  Materials Exams ( 40 questions 30 min),
Category A   – Materials and Hardware Exams ( 52 questions 65 min),
Category B1Materials and Hardware Exams ( 72 questions 90 min),
Category B2Materials and Hardware Exams ( 60 questions 75 min),
Category B3Materials and Hardware Exams ( 60 questions 75 min),

EASA Part 66 Module 6 Book Forum

Module 6: Materials...
 

Module 6: Materials and Hardware

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EASA Part 66 Module 6 Notes Content:

6.9 – TRANSMISSIONS
GEAR TYPES AND APPLICATIONS
DRIVING AND DRIVEN GEARS Two gears with teeth on their outer edges, as shown in Figure 9-1, act like a first class lever when one gear drives the other. The gear with the input force is called the drive gear, and the other is called the driven gear. The effort arm is the diameter of the driven gear, and the resistance arm is the diameter of the drive gear easa part 66 module 6 notes.
Notice that the two gears turn in opposite directions (the bottom one dockwise and the top one counterclockwise). The gear on top (yellow) is 9 inches in diameter and has 45 teeth, and the gear on the bottom (blue) is 12 inches in diameter and has 60 teeth. Imagine that the blue gear is driving the yellow one (blue is the drive, yellow is the driven). The mechanical advantage in terms of force would be the effort arm divided by the resistance arm, or 9 + 12, which is 0.75. This would actually be called a fractional disadvantage, because there would be less force out than form in. The mechanical advantage in terms of distance (rpm in this case), would be 12 9, or 1.33 easa part 66 module 6 notes.
This analysis tells us that when a large gear drives a small one, the small one turns faster and has less available force. In order to be a force gaining machine, the small gear needs to turn the large one. When the terminology reduction gearbox is used, such as a propeller reduction gearbox, it means that there is more rpm going in than is coming out. The end result is an increase in force, and ultimately torque.
BEVEL GEARS Bevel gears are used to change the plane of rotation, so that a shaft turning horizontally can make a vertical shaft rotate. The size of the gears and their number of teeth determine the mechanical advantage, and whether force is being increased or rpm is being increased. If each gear has the same number of teeth, there would be no change in force or rpm. (Figure 9-2)
Bevel gears are an excellent choice for intersecting shaft systems. However, they are typically not used to join parallel shafts because they can become noisy at high speeds. easa part 66 module 6 notes